Cooperation Critical to National Security, Resilience

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Lt. gen. Evans speaks
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Cooperation Critical to National Security, Resilience

National resilience requires close cooperation between the Department of Homeland Security, DoD and the Army, experts said Oct. 12 at a forum held during the Association of the U.S. Army’s 2021 Annual Meeting and Exposition. 

“Our country is no longer a safe haven for those who want to do us harm,” said Lt. Gen. A.C. Roper Jr., deputy commander of U.S. Northern Command. Building national resiliency is national defense, he said, noting potential adversaries have been watching as the U.S. responds to disasters and are ready to react if given a chance. 

Water Shortages Present National Security Challenge

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Water Shortages Present National Security Challenge

Climate change and the accompanying reduction in drinking water will pose a serious risk to national security by 2040 unless mitigating action is taken, an Army Corps of Engineers environmental engineer warned during a webinar hosted by the Army Futures Command’s Mad Scientist program. 

People, Teamwork Are Priorities for New Defense Chief

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Lloyd Austin
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People, Teamwork Are Priorities for New Defense Chief

DoD is committed to developing the right people, priorities and purpose of mission as it continues to defend the United States, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin says in a March 4 message to the force.

In the three-page memo, Austin outlines his top priorities: defending the nation, taking care of people, and succeeding through teamwork. Accomplishing these goals will require “aligning our priorities and capabilities to a changing and dynamic threat landscape,” he writes.

Security Guidance Focuses on Support at Home and Abroad

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President Biden, VP Harris, SecDef Austin
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Security Guidance Focuses on Support at Home and Abroad

Interim national security guidance from President Joe Biden heavily focuses on closely working with allies and partners and “renewing our own enduring sources of national strength.” 

Hicks Warns of Tighter Military Budgets, Tough Cuts

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Hicks Warns of Tighter Military Budgets, Tough Cuts

The Biden administration’s pick to be deputy defense secretary warned a Senate committee to prepare for tighter military budgets. 

Kathleen Hicks, a former Pentagon official who most recently was senior vice president of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, would be the first woman in U.S. history to serve in the second highest DoD post. She would serve under Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, a retired Army general who is the first Black person to lead the Pentagon. 

Budget Uncertainty Threatens National Security

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Budget Uncertainty Threatens National Security

Fearing that the White House and Congress are headed for a budgetary stalemate, the acting defense secretary warned lawmakers of the potential harm.

“No enemy in the field has done more damage to our military’s combat readiness in years past than sequestration and budget instability,” Patrick M. Shanahan told the House Appropriations Committee’s subcommittee on defense. Shanahan has been acting secretary of defense since Jan. 1.

Defense Strategy Requires New Mindset

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Defense Strategy Requires New Mindset

The Trump administration’s 2018 National Defense Strategy represents a “fundamental shift” in defense and deterrence policy for the U.S., one of its authors told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Report Identifies Emerging Security Threats

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Report Identifies Emerging Security Threats

An unclassified synopsis of long-range emerging national security threats warns the U.S. military and its allies will need to be nimble in the face of widening efforts by adversaries to achieve objectives without resorting to conflict and to also be prepared for widening threats from advanced weapons such as hypersonic missiles, electronic warfare and cyber weapons.

Artificial Intelligence Rises as Major National Security Issue

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Artificial Intelligence Rises as Major National Security Issue

While a national commission is forming to review implications of artificial intelligence in national security programs, the Association of the U.S. Army will host a two-day symposium in Detroit looking at ways autonomous systems, machine learning and robotics can be used to expand capabilities and solve military problems.

Hosted by AUSA’s Institute of Land Warfare, the Army Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence Symposium and Exposition will be held Nov. 28–29 at the Cobo Center on the riverfront in downtown Detroit.