Webinar Highlights Lessons from George Washington

Image
George Washington
Title
Webinar Highlights Lessons from George Washington

Retired Lt. Gen. James Dubik, an Association of the U.S. Army senior fellow, will speak June 8 at a webinar hosted by the association.

Part of AUSA’s Noon Report series, the event will begin at noon Eastern. It is free, but registration is required here.

Merrill’s Marauders Recognized With Gold Medal

Image
Merrill's Marauders
Title
Merrill’s Marauders Recognized With Gold Medal

Nearly eight decades after their heroic actions during World War II, the Army’s famed Merrill’s Marauders were honored May 25 during a virtual Congressional Gold Medal ceremony. 

The Marauders “answered the call for the most dangerous missions” and “faced the most brutal conditions in the jungles of Burma,” Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said during the ceremony.

Retired Gen. Joulwan Speaks at AUSA Webinar

Image
Watchman at the gate book
Title
Retired Gen. Joulwan Speaks at AUSA Webinar

Retired Gen. George Joulwan, whose Army career spanned 36 years and gave him a front-row seat to history, will speak April 20 during a webinar hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army.

Speaking as part of AUSA’s Thought Leaders series, Joulwan will discuss his new book, Watchman at the Gates: A Soldier’s Journey from Berlin to Bosnia.

Today’s Military Can Learn from Roman Empire

Image
Roman carving
Title
Today’s Military Can Learn from Roman Empire

The U.S. military can learn from strategies used by the Roman Empire, especially as it hones its focus on great-power competition, according to a new paper published by the Association of the U.S. Army.

In “Modern Problems Require Ancient Solutions: Lessons From Roman Competitive Posture,” author Maj. John Dzwonczyk says the Roman Empire’s longevity was a result of how it shaped perceptions. 

Modern Problems Require Ancient Solutions: Lessons From Roman Competitive Posture

Introduction

At varying times and with varying validity, Byzantium, the Holy Roman Empire and Russia have all been compared to the Roman Empire or called its successor. The United States is the only modern comparison. Rome was a global power with a Parthian regional rival. The United States is a global power with Chinese and Russian regional rivals. Rome had client states. The United States has formal allies. Rome and the United States each controlled or control the most powerful and effective—though significantly, not the largest—military forces of their times.