Articles from ARMY Magazine, Headline News, and AUSA News on Congressional Budget topics affecting the U.S. Army and the U.S. Military

Wormuth: Budget Delays ‘Significant Problem’ for Army

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Wormuth: Budget Delays ‘Significant Problem’ for Army

A 5.2% pay increase for soldiers and civilian employees, more than $5.3 billion in procurement programs and critical updates to ammunition production facilities could be at risk without a full-year budget for fiscal 2024, the Army’s top leaders warned.

Testifying April 19 before the House Armed Services Committee, Army Secretary Christine Wormuth said a stopgap measure, known as a continuing resolution, would be a “significant problem” for the Army.

Army Lists Unfunded Priorities

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Army Lists Unfunded Priorities

On top of its $185.5 billion budget request for fiscal 2024, the Army has prepared a supplemental list of $1.93 billion in unfunded priorities.

The so-called wish list of additional spending was provided to Congress under a long-standing request from lawmakers to show how additional funds might be spent.

The 2024 supplemental request is far smaller than last year’s $5.1 billion unfunded priorities list.

2024 Budget Funds Top Priorities, Leaders Say

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2024 Budget Funds Top Priorities, Leaders Say

The 2024 Army budget doesn’t contain big across-the-board increases, but the $185.5 billion request is enough to take care of the service’s top priorities, Army budget officials said March 23 at an Association of the U.S. Army event.

“All in all, we are very excited about our request,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Bennett, the 32nd director of the Army budget. He described the proposed budget as a “strategy-informed” document that supports the National Defense Strategy with investments for people and transformation programs.

Joint Association Letter Raises Budget Concerns

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Joint Association Letter Raises Budget Concerns

The Association of the U.S. Army, joined by four other military associations, is urging key lawmakers to approve a timely and adequate defense budget to avoid unnecessary disruptions in modernization and people programs.

Army Budget Experts Speak at AUSA Coffee Series

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AUSA Coffee Series logo
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Army Budget Experts Speak at AUSA Coffee Series

Army budget experts will discuss the service’s fiscal 2024 budget request March 23 at a Coffee Series event hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army.

The in-person event at AUSA headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, opens at 6:30 a.m. with registration, coffee and networking. The program is scheduled to begin at 7:15 a.m. It is free for military members, government employees and the media. All attendees are encouraged to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Masks are optional.

Army ‘Very Pleased’ with $185.5 Billion Budget

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Army ‘Very Pleased’ with $185.5 Billion Budget

The fiscal 2024 defense budget unveiled March 13 includes a 5.2% across-the-board pay increase and an overall $26 billion hike in defense spending.

The Army’s $185.5 billion share, which is $5.6 billion less than the fiscal 2023 budget approved by Congress, covers the service’s priorities, briefers said as the budget was unveiled.

AUSA Unveils 2023 Focus Areas

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AUSA Unveils 2023 Focus Areas

On-time and adequate funding, as well as programs focused on people, modernization and readiness, remain top advocacy efforts for the Association of the U.S. Army.

Military Compensation Review Ordered

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Military Compensation Review Ordered

The White House announced Jan. 31 that the 14th Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation will take a closer look at the adequacy of pay and benefits for dual-income households. 

“The unique factors affecting military household incomes might require structural changes, to include the development of a new benchmark for military compensation,” says a memorandum from President Joe Biden establishing the review. 

People Remain Top National Guard Priority

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People Remain Top National Guard Priority

From expanding benefits to modernizing its combat forces, the National Guard continues to prioritize its people after a challenging year, the component’s top general said. 

“What does the future look like for our National Guard? What are our priorities going forward? They’re … people, readiness, modernization and reform,” said Gen. Daniel Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau.

Underfunding Army Poses Big Risk

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Underfunding Army Poses Big Risk

In a new Association of the U.S. Army policy paper, former acting Army Secretary John Whitley highlights the dangers to the Army and the nation from ignoring ground warfare capabilities. 

He’s concerned that current planning and budgeting overlook the vital role ground forces, particularly the U.S. Army, have played in past conflicts and will likely play in the future.