Articles from ARMY Magazine, Headline News, and AUSA News on Congressional Budget topics affecting the U.S. Army and the U.S. Military

Predictive Maintenance Can Save Lives, Money

Image
Soldiers assigned to 16th Combat Aviation Brigade perform maintenance on an AH-64E Apache attack helicopter at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. on Nov. 8, 2022. Mount Rainier is visible in the background. (U.S. Army photo by Capt. Kyle Abraham, 16th Combat Aviation Brigade)
Title
Predictive Maintenance Can Save Lives, Money

Predictive maintenance on military weapons systems is already showing great value, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office.

“According to the Army, the use of predictive maintenance helped the Army avoid four serious aircraft accidents,” according to the December report.

AUSA Urges Congress to Pass 2023 Budget

Image
US Capitol
Title
AUSA Urges Congress to Pass 2023 Budget

The Association of the U.S. Army has joined several other military and veterans’ groups to urge Congress to pass a full-year budget for fiscal 2023.

“Our nation faces many threats, and our uniformed services operate in a very challenging environment,” the groups say in Dec. 8 letters to leading lawmakers in the Senate and the House of Representatives. “The numerous demands on the uniformed services are complicated by the impact of inflation which erodes purchasing power.” 

Compromise Bill Adds $45 Billion to Defense Budget

Image
US Capitol
Title
Compromise Bill Adds $45 Billion to Defense Budget

A compromise $857.9 billion defense policy bill edging toward congressional approval includes an additional $45 billion above the Pentagon’s request to offset the effects of inflation while also allowing the acceleration of transformative weapons and programs.

The measure includes a 4.6% raise for uniformed and civilian workers and expands allowances for lower ranking service members as part of a Basic Needs Allowance.

Pentagon Concerned by Budget Delays

Image
The Pentagon
Title
Pentagon Concerned by Budget Delays

Exercises and training, as well as hundreds of new programs and projects, will be disrupted or on hold if the military is forced to continue operating without a fiscal 2023 budget, officials said.

“Spending will be limited to last year’s levels and priorities, imposing significant fiscal and managerial constraints on the Department,” Pentagon spokesman Air Force Brig. Gen. Pat Ryder said in a statement. 

Army Building Maintenance Backlog Tops $19 Billion

Image
Soldier performing building maintenance
Title
Army Building Maintenance Backlog Tops $19 Billion

With more than 200,000 buildings on its installations around the world, the Army faces a maintenance backlog worth several billion dollars, according to a new report from the Congressional Budget Office. 

The report, which analyzed 49,000 of those buildings in use on 88 Army installations across the U.S., estimates that “the cost of eliminating the deferred maintenance backlog and returning the buildings to the Army’s standards would be about $19 billion.”

Budget Delay Causing ‘Significant’ Harm

Image
US Capitol
Title
Budget Delay Causing ‘Significant’ Harm

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin is urging lawmakers to pass a full-year budget for fiscal 2023, warning that “failure to do so will result in significant harm to our people and our programs.”

The military and the rest of the federal government are operating under a stopgap measure that expires Dec. 16. Known as a continuing resolution, the measure allows federal programs to continue at current spending levels and prohibits the start of new programs.

White House Seeks Extra Army Funding

Image
Soldiers train in Poland.
Title
White House Seeks Extra Army Funding

A supplemental military budget request from the White House to Congress seeks additional funding for Army programs, all aimed at operations in Europe.

The request sent Nov. 16 includes a $3 billion boost in operation and maintenance funds for personnel support, which includes extra flying hours, maintenance, weapons systems sustainment, intelligence analysis and other unit support costs that weren’t included in the budget submitted to Congress earlier in the year.

Legislative Delay Hurts Army Programs

Image
Soldiers prepare for training,
Title
Legislative Delay Hurts Army Programs

Delays in passing the fiscal 2023 defense policy and funding legislation is adding to the Army’s problems.

The fiscal year began Oct. 1 with the Army and the rest of the federal government operating under a temporary funding resolution that has limited funds and does not allow for new programs to begin or for any major changes in existing programs.

AUSA Backs Minimum 4.6% Raise for Soldiers

Image
U.S. Capitol in the fall.
Title
AUSA Backs Minimum 4.6% Raise for Soldiers

In a letter to key lawmakers, the Association of the U.S. Army is advocating for adequate funding for Army programs, a pay raise for troops and resources to improve quality of life for service members and their families.

Heritage Ranks Army Readiness as ‘Very Strong’

Image
soldiers training
Title
Heritage Ranks Army Readiness as ‘Very Strong’

The Heritage Foundation’s 2023 Index of U.S. Military Strength ranks the Army as a “marginal” power, which is better than the “weak” Navy and Space Force and the “very weak” Air Force. 

The Oct. 18 document rates the Marine Corps as “strong.” 

The 2022 Heritage rankings also listed the Army as “marginal.”