Army Steps Up Efforts to Prevent Harassment, Assault

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Army Steps Up Efforts to Prevent Harassment, Assault

The Army continues to search for ways to prevent and eliminate sexual harassment and assault in the ranks.

Its latest effort is a newly released Rand Corp. study that says understanding the factors behind sexual harassment and assault are key to prevention. The study, which was commissioned by the Army, calls for the service to continue working to improve unit and command climate and investigate the differences between installations and commands that experience higher rates of harassment and assault.

More Work Required on SHARP

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Dr. James Helis
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More Work Required on SHARP

Efforts to prevent sexual assault and harassment in the Army have fallen short, but changes are being made on several fronts, a senior official said.

“We are just not where we need to be with the program,” said James Helis, director of the Army Resilience Directorate. The December release of an independent review of the climate at Fort Hood, Texas, “caused us to take a hard look in the mirror at ourselves and our program.”

Army Resilience Director Speaks at AUSA Webinar

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Army Resilience Director Speaks at AUSA Webinar

The director of the Army Resilience Directorate will speak April 8 during the Association of the U.S. Army’s Thought Leaders webinar.

James Helis, who has been in the job since March 2019, will discuss the Army’s efforts to prevent sexual assault and harassment in the ranks. He also will talk about how the Army works to provide professional, compassionate and comprehensive care and support to members of the Army team when sexual harassment or assault incidents occur.

DoD Commission to Address Sexual Assault, Harassment

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DoD Commission to Address Sexual Assault, Harassment

In its ongoing fight against sexual assault and sexual harassment in the ranks, the Pentagon is standing up an independent commission that will have 90 days to provide recommendations to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin. 

Lynn Rosenthal, who served during the Obama administration as the first White House adviser on violence against women, will lead the commission, Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said Feb. 26. The commission, which will include members from inside and outside the military, will review DoD policies and processes, Kirby said.

Army Bringing More Sexual Assault Cases to Trial

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Army Bringing More Sexual Assault Cases to Trial

Aided by statutes that strengthen the voice of sexual assault victims in the military judicial system, the Army is making progress in bringing cases to trial, the Army’s judge advocate general told Congress.

“Ten years ago, sexual assault offenses comprised 18% of Army trials. In 2018, 50% of trials in Army courtrooms were sexual assault trials. This is not a coincidence,” Lt. Gen. Charles N. Pede told the House Armed Services subcommittee on military personnel. 

Commanders ‘Essential’ to Fight Against Sex Assault

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Commanders ‘Essential’ to Fight Against Sex Assault

Removing commanders from the military justice process could exacerbate the problem of sexual assault and harassment in the ranks, the Army’s former top lawyer recently told Congress.

‘No Bystanders’ in Fight Against Sexual Assault

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‘No Bystanders’ in Fight Against Sexual Assault

The Army continues to focus on eradicating sexual harassment and assault from its ranks, and the service’s top leaders are calling on all soldiers to join the effort.

“We all have a responsibility to look out for one another—there can be no bystanders,” Army Secretary Mark T. Esper and Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley wrote in a new message to the force.