Abrams: North Korea Nuclear Threat Remains

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Abrams: North Korea Nuclear Threat Remains

U.S. forces in Korea have faced a changing and challenging training environment but remain ready to maintain peace and security on the peninsula, Gen. Robert Abrams told the House Armed Services Committee. 

Testifying March 10, the commander of the United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea said North Korea “continues to pose a threat to the international security environment with no indication that they have ceased development of nuclear capabilities.” 

Dunford: Readiness Not Compromised in South Korea

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Dunford: Readiness Not Compromised in South Korea

The end of high-profile U.S. and South Korean training exercises has not diminished warfighting capabilities, according to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford.

“I am very confident today that we have not compromised the readiness of the alliance to go to war, should that be required,” Dunford said May 29 at a Brookings Institution event in Washington, D.C.

U.S.-South Korea Alliance Remains Strong

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U.S.-South Korea Alliance Remains Strong

The alliance between the U.S. and South Korea “is stronger and more ready than ever,” the top U.S. general in the Republic of Korea said May 22.

Speaking at the Association of the U.S. Army’s LANPAC Symposium and Exposition in Honolulu, Gen. Robert B. Abrams, commander of U.S. Forces Korea and U.N. Command-Combined Forces Command, said the 65-year-old alliance between the U.S. and South Korea remains critical for economic and security reasons.

New Exhibit Honors Soldiers of ‘Forgotten War’

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New Exhibit Honors Soldiers of ‘Forgotten War’

The Army is making sure the Korean War, a conflict that took 36,000 American lives and is often referred to as “the Forgotten War,” is anything but forgotten as the 69th anniversary of its beginning approaches.

“Where the Hell is Korea? Warfare in the Land of Sorrow,” a new exhibit opening May 18 at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, showcases the war’s timeline and presents stories of soldiers who fought on the front lines and those who supported them. 

Abrams Calls South Korea Evacuation a ‘Wicked Problem’

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Abrams Calls South Korea Evacuation a ‘Wicked Problem’

The nominee to become the top U.S. commander in Korea said the evacuation of civilians from the Korean Peninsula presents “a wicked problem,” but he is confident twice-a-year drills have prepared the U.S. military for the problem it faces.

He also stressed that the risk to civilians isn’t limited to the families of U.S. troops but threatens a wide population.

Mattis: U.S. Not Withdrawing Troops From South Korea

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Mattis: U.S. Not Withdrawing Troops From South Korea

The U.S. has no intention of withdrawing troops from South Korea as part of any agreement with North Korea, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said.

“I really don’t know where this stuff comes from,” Mattis told reporters. “Once someone has made it up, apparently it gets a life of its own.” Mattis’ remarks came as the U.S. and North Korea are preparing for a possible June 12 summit in Singapore.

Delaying South Korea Exercises Was Practical Decision

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Delaying South Korea Exercises Was Practical Decision

A joint U.S-South Korean decision to postpone planned military exercises until after the 2018 Winter Olympics was more of a practical than political decision, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said.

The PyeongChang Olympics begin Friday, February 9 with the opening ceremony and a few events, and ends February 25. Joint military drills had been planned in South Korea during at least part of the international games but the two countries announced they would hold off.

U.S. Challenged to Quickly Deliver Forces to Korea

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U.S. Challenged to Quickly Deliver Forces to Korea

The U.S. has the airlift capability to deliver an Army armored brigade combat team to South Korea in 30 days, a task that would take up to 200 flights by C-17 transports, but moving a larger force—especially into a contested environment—would tax available mobilization assets, the commander of U.S. Transportation Command told Congress.

Bill Supports Bigger Active Force

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Bill Supports Bigger Active Force

Mar. 7, 2017

The Army would get some money to begin reversing its active-duty drawdown of recent years, maintain a combat aviation brigade in South Korea, and support four Apache attack helicopter battalions in the National Guard. All of this is under a defense budget bill passed by a key House committee.