Articles from ARMY Magazine, Headline News, and AUSA News on Army Modernization

Army’s Night Court Could be Model for DoD

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Army’s Night Court Could be Model for DoD

Ambitious plans for budget reform by the new deputy defense secretary will require help from Congress, says Mackenzie Eaglen of the American Enterprise Institute. 

Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks has mentioned a long list of potential reforms, including ending a rush in spending at the end of the fiscal year caused by use-it-or-lose-it policies, Eaglen said. This practice can lead to spending on frivolous items, said Eaglen, a national security strategist who once worked at the Association of the U.S. Army. 

McConville: Army Has No Money to Waste

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McConville: Army Has No Money to Waste

Every soldier and every dollar count as the Army balances today’s missions with an urgent push to modernize the force for tomorrow, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said.

“When I look at the demands for the Army … we’d like a much bigger Army, but what I have to do at my level is determine, what can we actually afford?” McConville said Feb. 17 during a webinar hosted by the Heritage Foundation.

Leaders must be ready to make tough decisions as the military braces for flat or smaller defense budgets in the coming years.

Futures Command Leader Expects Unchanged Priorities

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Futures Command Leader Expects Unchanged Priorities

While recognizing that presidential elections can often mean many changes, Army Futures Command's commander said he expects most of the Army’s priorities are likely to stay the same.

“I remain committed, as long as the Army will have me, to maintain that momentum regardless of the upcoming changes with the new administration,” said Gen. Mike Murray, speaking at a Jan. 25 webinar hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “Our modernization priorities have remained consistent, and they will remain consistent.”

Army Sits Out Optionally Manned Vehicle Competition

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Army Sits Out Optionally Manned Vehicle Competition

Army engineers and scientists may be some of the smartest and most experienced people when it comes to requirements for combat vehicles, but they won’t be designing their own. 

Speaking at a Heritage Foundation webinar, "Building Tomorrow’s Army Today: Modernizing with Science, Technology and Engineering,” Maj. Gen. John George of the Army Combat Capabilities Development Command and members of his staff were asked about a short-lived idea for the Army to design its own optionally manned combat vehicle. 

Army Continues Modernization, Transformation Push

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Army Continues Modernization, Transformation Push

The Army’s modernization efforts remain as critical as ever in 2021 amid a high operations tempo and growing competition from adversaries such as Russia and China, the Army’s top general said.

“The Army must always be ready to fight and win,” Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said Jan. 19 during The AUSA Noon Report, a webinar hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army. “In this era of great-power competition, the Army must always be ready to compete to aggressively protect our national interests.”

Stop Upgrading: Buy 21st Century Equipment

Introduction

Remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA), i.e., drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), revolutionized how the U.S. military conducts military operations against insurgents and terrorists. This revolution resulted from an early outside push from Congress and a change to U.S. foreign policy (namely, the prioritization of counterterrorism).1 The RPA revolution substantially changed the U.S.

Today’s Military Can Learn from Roman Empire

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Today’s Military Can Learn from Roman Empire

The U.S. military can learn from strategies used by the Roman Empire, especially as it hones its focus on great-power competition, according to a new paper published by the Association of the U.S. Army.

In “Modern Problems Require Ancient Solutions: Lessons From Roman Competitive Posture,” author Maj. John Dzwonczyk says the Roman Empire’s longevity was a result of how it shaped perceptions.