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Research and You

The deployment Life study

The Deployment Life Study examines how deployment affects the health and well-being of military families over the course of three years. The success of military operations depends not only on the preparation of service members, but also on the preparation of their families—a concept known as family readiness. This study, conducted by the RAND Corporation, helps us learn more about the skills and tools that military families need in order to handle the stresses associated with deployments. Read more here:

Blue Star Families 2015 Military Lifestyle Survey

Blue Star Families’ annual Military Family Lifestyle Survey provides a more complete understanding of the experiences and challenges encountered by military families. Military families are much like their civilian neighbors. Many need dual incomes to meet their financial goals; are concerned about pay and benefits; worry about childcare and education; and want to establish roots and contribute to their community’s well-being. However, the unique demands of military service result in exceptional issues and challenges for service members and their families. Blue Star Families conducted its 6th annual Military Lifestyle Survey in April-May, 2015 to identify contemporary issues facing military families and to increase understanding and support of the military lifestyle. Over 6,200 military family members, including active duty service members and veterans, provided valuable insight regarding the true cost of sustaining the all-volunteer force. Learn more

Military Children and Families

The Future of Children, Vol. 23, No. 2, Fall 2013

Today’s military children and families experience unique hardships. They move around the country and the world repeatedly, and they must therefore adjust to new living environments, schools, and peer groups much more often than other children and families do. Given the extraordinary sacrifices that military personnel make, the children of military families deserve to have policies and programs designed to fit their developmental needs. The articles in this issue of Future of Children expand our knowledge and illuminate a path toward a more representative depiction of military children and their families.

Learning to Care

 Webinar series educates about military children

An ongoing webinar series, "Caring to Learn, Learning to Care," is sponsored by Purdue Extension, Operation: Military Kids and the Military Family Research Institute. Each 90-minute session features a presentation on a specific topic or aspect of dealing with children in military families.

RAND: Hidden Heroes: America's Military Caregiver

There are 5.5 million military caregivers across the United States, with nearly 20 percent caring for someone who served since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Military caregivers experience more health problems, face greater strains in family relationships, and have more workplace issues than noncaregivers. Changes are needed to both provide assistance to caregivers and to help them make plans for the future.