Articles on the latest developments and innovations in technology affecting landpower, the Army, and its soldiers.

Wormuth: Stakes are High in Ukraine

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Ukraine soldiers
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Wormuth: Stakes are High in Ukraine

By providing weapons and training, the U.S. is working to put the Ukrainians in the “strongest possible position” to defend their sovereignty and engage the Russians from a “position of strength,” Army Secretary Christine Wormuth said.

Speaking Dec. 3 on a panel during the Reagan National Defense Forum, Wormuth said the stakes are high. “Given what is at stake in Ukraine, not just for the Ukrainians, but for NATO and for the entire free world, it’s in our interest to give them what they need to defend their territory and push the Russians out,” she said.

Work Continues to Electrify Army Vehicles

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JLTV
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Work Continues to Electrify Army Vehicles

As the Army works to electrify its combat vehicles, it will not compromise combat effectiveness, a senior Army leader said.

Electric Vehicle Plans Will Give Troops Tactical Edge

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Douglas Bush, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology) speaks during the AUSA Contemporary Military Forum: Partners in Army Climate Resilience at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022. (Jen Milbrett for AUSA)
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Electric Vehicle Plans Will Give Troops Tactical Edge

Army plans to field hybrid-drive tactical vehicles by 2035 and fully electric tactical vehicles by 2050 align with a broader service strategy to slow climate change and transition more fully to renewable energy sources. 

But the Army’s top acquisition official says this move will also make soldiers more effective against the enemy.

Urgent Need for More Attention to Cyber Threats

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Lt. Gen. Laura Potter, Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2, speaks during the AUSA Contemporary Military Forum: Evolution of Cyber and Information Advantage at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022. (Jen Milbrett for AUSA)
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Urgent Need for More Attention to Cyber Threats

Army cyber forces must quickly and continually adapt to keep up with ever evolving threats, a panel of experts said Oct. 12 at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.

The Army constantly monitors and analyzes threats from China, which is America’s “pacing challenge,” and other adversaries including Russia, North Korea, Iran and terrorist organizations, said Lt. Gen. Laura Potter, deputy Army chief of staff for intelligence, G-2. “This really is a global problem,” she said.

Army Must Filter, Understand Data Faster Than Ever

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EVENT at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. (Rod Lamkey for AUSA)
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Army Must Filter, Understand Data Faster Than Ever

Future warfare requires the Army to gather vastly more information from an ever-widening array of sensors without overwhelming an end user with such a tidal wave of data that it becomes useless, a panel of Army experts said. 

“We have a lot of work to do,” said Lt. Gen. Laura Potter, the deputy Army chief of staff for intelligence, G-2, in an Oct. 10 discussion about the importance of gathering data and using ground, space and aerial sensing in battles in 2030 and beyond. 

Army Drone Stays Aloft for 64 Days

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Airbus' Zephyr
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Army Drone Stays Aloft for 64 Days

After a record-breaking 64 days and almost 35,000 miles aloft, the Army’s latest test of a solar-powered, ultra-long endurance drone has come to an end.

The unmanned aerial system, Airbus’ Zephyr 8, launched June 15 from Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, and crashed Aug. 18, recording a remarkable flight of more than two months.

Forces Must Evolve to Survive

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Soldier on battlefield on computer
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Forces Must Evolve to Survive

Across the XVIII Airborne Corps, leaders have their eye on getting the most out of the data that proliferates on and off the battlefield.

“Whether in the military or business, if you’re not learning, you’re failing, and in our line of work, you’re dying,” said Brig. Gen. John Cogbill, then-chief of staff for the XVIII Airborne Corps. “You have to continue to evolve and to learn. You need to be able to not only survive on the modern battlefield but dominate the modern battlefield.”

Webinar Tackles Army Counter-Drone Efforts

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Soldier with anti drone technology
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Webinar Tackles Army Counter-Drone Efforts

An upcoming webinar from the Association of the U.S. Army will focus on Army efforts to counter the growing threat of unmanned aerial systems.

Maj. Gen. Sean Gainey, director of the Joint Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office and director of fires in the office of the deputy Army chief of staff for operations, will speak at noon Eastern Aug. 23.

The event is free, but registration is required here.