Articles from ARMY Magazine, Headline News, and AUSA News on topics related to the Russian Military

2014 Ilovaisk Siege Provides Lessons on Future Warfare

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2014 Ilovaisk Siege Provides Lessons on Future Warfare

A new Landpower Essay published by the Association of the U.S. Army looks at the changing landscape of future warfare. 

Maj. Amos Fox, an armor officer who frequently writes for AUSA, uses the siege of a 16,000-population Ukrainian town to show how proxy wars and manufactured insurgencies have changed modern warfare. The 2014 battle pitted Ukrainian military and paramilitary forces against pro-Russian insurgents, leading to the Ukrainian forces being encircled by the insurgents for several days and facing heavy casualties from artillery barrages. 

Russian Forces Pose ‘Fierce’ Challenge to U.S. Troops

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Russian Forces Pose ‘Fierce’ Challenge to U.S. Troops

Preparing soldiers for high-intensity combat against the Russians may be “commanders’ most important task,” according to a paper published by the Association of the U.S. Army.

Retired Army Col. Richard Hooker, author of “How to Fight the Russians,” says combat against the adversary will be “fierce" and at a level the U.S. Army hasn’t seen since in several decades.  

“It is time to steel our soldiers’ hearts against the test to come,” he wrote.

CSIS: Competing Forces Shape Army’s Future

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CSIS: Competing Forces Shape Army’s Future

A new review by the nonpartisan Center for Strategic and International Studies says the U.S. Army faces multiple challenges in the next few years. 

To focus on the possibility of so-called “great power” conflicts with China or Russia, the Army needs expensive advanced weapons and other capabilities. It has a day-to-day demand for deployed forces. It also faces difficulties recruiting. The combination of those three dynamics will shape the future as those competing needs are balanced, CSIS says in the Army portion of the larger report, “U.S. Military Forces in FY2021.”  

More Capability Needed for ‘Gray Zone’ Conflicts

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More Capability Needed for ‘Gray Zone’ Conflicts

Rigid mobilization processes and limited authorities restrict combatant commanders’ ability to quickly employ reserve component forces for contingencies that fall short of armed combat, according to a new report published by the Association of the U.S. Army.

Defender-Europe Will Be ‘Tall Task’ for Army

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Defender-Europe Will Be ‘Tall Task’ for Army

There won’t be “anything easy” about deploying 20,000 U.S.-based soldiers to Europe for an exercise this spring, but planning and carrying it out will reinforce training and readiness and demonstrate the military’s ability to rapidly project forces anywhere in the world, senior leaders said.

Planning for the U.S. Army Europe-led Defender-Europe 2020 began more than a year ago, and it is set to launch in February with the deployment of more than 20,000 pieces of equipment from five U.S. seaports and 20,000 soldiers from units across the country.

China-Russia Cooperation Complicates Planning

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Air Force Maj. Gen. Thomas Murphy
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China-Russia Cooperation Complicates Planning

The U.S. faces many challenges in a growing strategic competition with Russia and China, but making the situation even more complicated are signs of increasing cooperation between the two top U.S. competitors, according to experts who spoke Oct. 30 at a one-day conference hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army’s Institute of Land Warfare.

This was the first AUSA professional forum solely focused on competition with China and Russia.

RAND: Russia Continues Developing Ground Forces

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RAND: Russia Continues Developing Ground Forces

Russia has developed its ground capabilities and the ability to sustain its forces, but it is not likely to initiate a large-scale ground war, according to a recent RAND Corporation report. 

In response, the report recommends the U.S. Army strengthen its regional partners’ security forces and consider how to prepare for potential conflict.

U.S., Allies Must Learn to ‘Win Without Fighting’

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Lt. Gen. Eric Wesley, deputy commanding general of U.S. Army Futures Command, answers a question during a panel at the 2019 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition on Oct. 15, 2019.
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U.S., Allies Must Learn to ‘Win Without Fighting’

The United States and its allies and partners must solve the problem of how to face adversaries in so-called "left of conflict" competition, a panel of experts said Oct. 15 during a forum at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.

The term describes the concept of engaging without combat. Russia, a potential near-peer adversary, is highly skilled at "left of conflict" operations, the panelists said. 

Military Faces Growing Threats in SOUTHCOM Region

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Military Faces Growing Threats in SOUTHCOM Region

The top officer for U.S. Southern Command was alarmed to learn how much China, Russia and Iran have expanded their influence and access in the region, describing it as the “most disturbing insight” he’s gained in the last several months. 

Navy Adm. Craig Faller, who took command of SOUTHCOM last November, overseeing Central and South America and the Caribbean, said the National Defense Strategy makes one issue clear: Great-power competition has reemerged as the top security challenge to the United States.