Invasion of Ukraine has Global Impact

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Soldiers train in Latvia.
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Invasion of Ukraine has Global Impact

While the Army remains busy supporting Ukraine and America’s NATO partners, the force has not let go of its focus on other hot spots around the world, Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said.

“We’re a global organization,” McConville said Sept. 7. “We have to be able to do more than one thing at once.”

Speaking at an event hosted by Defense One, McConville said this includes boots on the ground in the Middle East, Asia, Europe and elsewhere, all while supporting defense of the homeland.

Thousands More Deploy to Europe Amid Ukraine Crisis

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Thousands More Deploy to Europe Amid Ukraine Crisis

About 7,000 more American troops, including an armored brigade combat team, will deploy to Germany in the coming days as the U.S. moves to further reassure its NATO allies, the Pentagon said Feb. 24.

The announcement came as President Joe Biden announced new sanctions against Russia for launching an invasion of Ukraine with air and missile strikes, armored convoys and ground troops.

Russian President Vladimir Putin “is the aggressor,” Biden said, the Associated Press reported. “Putin chose this war, and now he and his country will bear the consequences.”

Vice Chief Says Army Has ‘High Level of Readiness’

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Vice Chief Says Army Has ‘High Level of Readiness’

The Army is meeting 50% of the nation’s global security requirements while spending just 25% of the defense budget, Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph Martin said. 

This includes 63,000 soldiers involved in domestic operations such as border security, COVID-19 assignments and supporting law enforcement, he said. “The demand for Army capabilities by federal agencies and combatant commanders continues to exceed supply, and we do not anticipate a decrease in demand.” 

Reserve Soldiers Continue Mission Despite COVID-19

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Reserve Soldiers Continue Mission Despite COVID-19

Despite a host of challenges, the first major Army Reserve unit to mobilize as the COVID-19 pandemic set in recently completed a successful nine-month deployment to the Middle East, supporting operations across 13 countries while keeping soldiers safe.

Army to Allow Temporary NCO Promotions

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Army to Allow Temporary NCO Promotions

Some soldiers will face fewer promotion hurdles while finishing their professional military education courses when a new Army policy takes effect Jan. 1. 

Under the new policy, NCOs from sergeant to sergeant major who haven’t finished their required education may still qualify for short-term promotions, Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston announced Nov. 24.

Grinston said the change can help soldiers who are deployed, starting a family or attending the non-resident Sergeants Major Course.

DoD Takes ‘Holistic’ Look at Deployments Worldwide

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DoD Takes ‘Holistic’ Look at Deployments Worldwide

Military leaders are taking on a “holistic review” of troops’ footprint around the world as the U.S. remains focused on “great-power competition,” according to the Pentagon’s top general.

“There’s a very strong argument to be made that we may have forces in places that they shouldn’t be, and we may have forces that are needed in places that they’re not right now,” Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said Dec. 2 while speaking with the Brookings Institution. 

Army Continues Aligning Footprint in Europe

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Army Continues Aligning Footprint in Europe

The Army’s 2nd Cavalry Regiment is expected to continue playing a key role in Europe even as the Pentagon carries out a plan to bring the Stryker unit home to the U.S. 

Speaking Oct. 20 at the Atlantic Council, Defense Secretary Mark Esper said that after talks with his counterparts in Romania and Bulgaria as well as the Baltic States, “there is now the real opportunity of keeping the 2nd Cavalry Regiment forward in some of these countries on an enduring basis.”

New Deployment Model Provides Predictability

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New Deployment Model Provides Predictability

The Army is developing a new model that would prepare soldiers for current and future missions by aligning divisions with geographic regions on predictable deployment and training rotations.

The force generation model, known as the Regionally Aligned Readiness and Modernization Model, or ReARMM, is expected to be ready to launch at the beginning of fiscal year 2022, Lt. Gen. Charles Flynn, deputy Army chief of staff for operations, said in a contemporary military forum at AUSA Now, the virtual annual meeting of the Association of the U.S. Army.

Plans Call for No U.S. Troops in Afghanistan by May 2021

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Plans Call for No U.S. Troops in Afghanistan by May 2021

The U.S. military is “on a path” to reduce troop levels in Afghanistan to between 4,000 and 5,000 this fall and a complete withdrawal in 2021. 

Testifying before Congress, David Helvey, the Pentagon’s Indo-Pacific affairs policy chief, said the evolving U.S. strategy “prioritizes ending the war through a political process, acknowledging that there is no military solution to the conflict.”