Papers Highlight Civil Affairs’ Role in Future Ops

Image
Soldiers
Title
Papers Highlight Civil Affairs’ Role in Future Ops

The latest volume of “Civil Affairs Issue Papers”—a joint effort between the Civil Affairs Association and the Association of the U.S. Army—is now available.

The seventh edition of the series contains a report from the 2020 Civil Affairs Symposium and five authored papers on topics such as information operations, civil-military operations and relations, operating in the gray zone, using civil affairs to defeat hybrid threats, and great-power competition.

Into the Gray Zone: Integration of Civil Affairs and Information Operations with Embassies

Introduction

As United States agencies transition to accomplish objectives set in the National Security Strategy (NSS), the Marine Corps has to adapt within joint, interorganizational and multinational (JIM) spheres to influence and accomplish objectives within the NSS and the National Defense Strategy (NDS). Information operations (IO) is one specific capability within the Marine Corps that has the potential to integrate with JIM aspects in support of the NSS and NDS.

Civil Considerations in an Era of Great-Power Competition

In July 1983, the New Delhi–based Patriot newspaper ran an article: “AIDS may invade India: Mystery Disease Caused by U.S. Experiments.” According to the publication, U.S. scientists based out of Fort Detrick, Maryland, had weaponized a virus to kill African Americans and gay people.1 Two years later, the story gained traction throughout Africa, and two East German biologists published scientific research proving that AIDS was developed in the United States. By 1987, U.S.

Civil Affairs and Civil-Military Cooperation: A Hybrid Solution to Defeat Hybrid Threats

Introduction 

United States Army civil affairs (CA) and NATO civil-military cooperation (CIMIC) forces are key to countering or minimizing threats that hybrid warfare imposes, especially within the battle of influence to control the narrative. Among the issues hindering this contribution is the disparity between CA and CIMIC doctrines. Deployed and deployable U.S. troop formations, including CA, have a deficit of knowledge about the NATO Civil-Military Interaction (CMI) concept, CIMIC mandates to implement CMI, capabilities, and modus operandi in European NATO nations.

A Gap in Thought and Deed: Civil-Military Relations and Civil-Military Operations

Introduction

Consideration of the state of civil-military relations (CMR), within friend or foe, is not adequately addressed within civil affairs (CA) doctrine and activities. This gap limits CA’s ability to be an effective tool for influence at the strategic level when in competition during irregular warfare (IW) against great-power competitors such as Russia and China. The few times CMR is mentioned in doctrine, the context is detached from the civilian/academic study of civil-military relations.

Changing the Business Model, Part III: Renewing Civil Affairs' Influence-Based Capabilities

Introduction

Civil affairs (CA) wields a unique form of influence through long-term overt network engagements with indigenous populations. However, existing doctrine and joint force training concepts do not fully operationalize CA’s strategic influence capabilities, and that needs to change. Without a concept to define, train and validate, this form of influence will remain underutilized.

2020 Civil Affairs Symposium Report

Introduction

On the heels of a highly successful Roundtable, the Civil Affairs Association’s1 annual fall Symposium on Monday–Wednesday, 5–7 October 2020, introduced an expanded, multi-component, interservice and interorganizational platform for rich intellectual capitalization of civil affairs (CA) professional and force development. The theme for the 2020–21 Civil Affairs Issue Papers is: “Civil Affairs: A Force for Influence in Competition.” 

Information, Influence Can Give Army Combat Edge

Image
Title
Information, Influence Can Give Army Combat Edge

A new paper published by the Association of the U.S. Army calls for the Army to dominate in the information space as much as it does in the physical realm.

“These capabilities are as essential to war-winning as combat forces and do not exist merely to set conditions for victory in conflict or return to competition,” author and retired Army Col. Christopher Holshek writes.

“Information-related capabilities to shape and influence the human geography can give the Army decisive advantage,” he says.