Questions Remain About China’s Growing Capabilities

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PLA Soldier
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Questions Remain About China’s Growing Capabilities

As China builds and modernizes its combat forces, little is known about how well those troops might perform and sustain themselves in a prolonged fight, according to a panel of analysts who study the Chinese military.

U.S. military leaders have described China as America’s “pacing challenge” as the U.S. military shifts from 20 years of war in Iraq and Afghanistan to preparing for large-scale combat operations on a complex future battlefield.

AUSA Returns to Indo-Pacific for LANPAC

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Gen. Charles Flynn speaks
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AUSA Returns to Indo-Pacific for LANPAC

LANPAC, an Association of the U.S. Army-sponsored event focused on the Indo-Pacific, opened May 17 in Honolulu with a clear message of strengthening joint training and cooperation between the U.S. and other nations in the region. 

Gen. Charles Flynn, U.S. Army Pacific commanding general, said the return of the land forces symposium is important after a three-year break because of the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Webinar Focuses on America’s Most Dangerous Rivals

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Webinar Focuses on America’s Most Dangerous Rivals

The military strategies of America’s most dangerous rivals will be the focus of a webinar hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army.

The event, part of the AUSA Noon Report series, will feature author Seth Jones, who will discuss his book Three Dangerous Men: Russia, China, Iran, and the Rise of Irregular Warfare.

It will take place at noon Eastern on March 30. The webinar is free, but registration is required here.

Military Must Prepare For ‘A Lot of Challenges’

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Soldiers conduct live-fire training
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Military Must Prepare For ‘A Lot of Challenges’

In the face of growing threats around the world, the U.S. military must remain ready for a range of challenges, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley said.

“We’re going to have to deal with a rising China, we have to deal with Russia, we will have North Korea, we have Iran, we have terrorists, we have climate change, we have COVID, we have wildfires, we have a lot of challenges,” Milley said. “As a great power, we have to be able to do all of those simultaneously.”

Chinese, US Armies Face Similar Recruiting Challenges

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A US recruit and a Chinese recruit
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Chinese, US Armies Face Similar Recruiting Challenges

The U.S. Army has an advantage over China when it comes to empowering its soldiers to make decisions, but the two countries face the same challenges recruiting young people for military service, according to the author of a new paper.

In an essay published by the Association of the U.S. Army as part of its Land Warfare Paper series, author Larry Wortzel notes that China’s People’s Liberation Army and the U.S. Army have a common focus on new technologies, data fusion and developing systems designed to compensate for a smaller military.

Indo-Pacific, Especially Taiwan, Has Challenges for US

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Indo-Pacific, Especially Taiwan, Has Challenges for US

China’s growing aggression is forcing the U.S. to think more seriously about deterrence and competition in the Indo-Pacific region, a panel of experts said during a webinar hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army.

The U.S. faces “unprecedented challenges” to its interests, particularly from China and Russia, said retired Gen. Robert Brown, AUSA executive vice president and a former commander of U.S. Army Pacific, who moderated the June 23 Thought Leaders discussion.

Growing Threats Challenge U.S. and Allies

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Growing Threats Challenge U.S. and Allies

A new unclassified global threat assessment from the U.S. intelligence community has the same old rivals: China, Russia, Iran and North Korea. 

Army Webinar Focuses on Future Conflict

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Army Webinar Focuses on Future Conflict

In looming competition with China, one of the biggest risks to the U.S. is getting involved in unnecessary skirmishes, an internationally recognized geopolitical strategist said during an Army-sponsored Mad Scientist webinar. 

George Friedman, founder and chairman of Geopolitical Futures and former CEO of Stratfor, described China as “terrified” the U.S. would economically hurt it by blocking its ports in a conflict. For this reason, China wants to face the U.S., but not in any open conflict, because “they cannot afford to lose,” Friedman said.