Chinese, US Armies Face Similar Recruiting Challenges

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A US recruit and a Chinese recruit
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Chinese, US Armies Face Similar Recruiting Challenges

The U.S. Army has an advantage over China when it comes to empowering its soldiers to make decisions, but the two countries face the same challenges recruiting young people for military service, according to the author of a new paper.

In an essay published by the Association of the U.S. Army as part of its Land Warfare Paper series, author Larry Wortzel notes that China’s People’s Liberation Army and the U.S. Army have a common focus on new technologies, data fusion and developing systems designed to compensate for a smaller military.

Indo-Pacific, Especially Taiwan, Has Challenges for US

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Army aviation pilot
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Indo-Pacific, Especially Taiwan, Has Challenges for US

China’s growing aggression is forcing the U.S. to think more seriously about deterrence and competition in the Indo-Pacific region, a panel of experts said during a webinar hosted by the Association of the U.S. Army.

The U.S. faces “unprecedented challenges” to its interests, particularly from China and Russia, said retired Gen. Robert Brown, AUSA executive vice president and a former commander of U.S. Army Pacific, who moderated the June 23 Thought Leaders discussion.

Growing Threats Challenge U.S. and Allies

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Growing Threats Challenge U.S. and Allies

A new unclassified global threat assessment from the U.S. intelligence community has the same old rivals: China, Russia, Iran and North Korea. 

Army Webinar Focuses on Future Conflict

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Soldiers dropping out of Osprey
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Army Webinar Focuses on Future Conflict

In looming competition with China, one of the biggest risks to the U.S. is getting involved in unnecessary skirmishes, an internationally recognized geopolitical strategist said during an Army-sponsored Mad Scientist webinar. 

George Friedman, founder and chairman of Geopolitical Futures and former CEO of Stratfor, described China as “terrified” the U.S. would economically hurt it by blocking its ports in a conflict. For this reason, China wants to face the U.S., but not in any open conflict, because “they cannot afford to lose,” Friedman said. 

China Continues Building Ability to Mobilize Army, People

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China Continues Building Ability to Mobilize Army, People

The Chinese army can “orchestrate mobilization” at a speed and scale that should make the U.S. hesitate, according to a new paper published by the Association of the U.S. Army.

“Since World War II, China has mobilized on a large scale several times—and the United States has not,” author and retired Army Col. Larry Wortzel writes.

In his paper, “Military Mobilization in Communist China,” Wortzel highlights five military campaigns between 1955 and 1979 to demonstrate China’s mobilization strength and its efforts to improve. 

Bipartisan Task Force Focuses on Future

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Chinese army soldiers in training
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Bipartisan Task Force Focuses on Future

A bipartisan House Armed Services Committee task force that spent a year focused on the challenging strategic environment facing the U.S. sees a window of opportunity for progress.

Speaking at the Hudson Institute, task force leaders Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts and Rep. Jim Banks of Indiana said DoD faces a pivotal period as it confronts current and evolving threats that require new concepts in warfighting and new technologies at a time when money to pay for the improvements could be scarce.

Military Mobilization in Communist China

Introduction

One of the foundational concepts in Mao Zedong’s thinking about politics and war is that mobilization and the “People’s War” (人民战争) are intrinsically linked.1 The ability of the Communist Party of China (CCP) to retain support depends on mobilizing the masses for political purposes, generating combat power and logistics support from the militia and industries.2 Mobilization also contributes to deterrence and preparation for potential protracted war.3 

CSIS: Competing Forces Shape Army’s Future

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CSIS: Competing Forces Shape Army’s Future

A new review by the nonpartisan Center for Strategic and International Studies says the U.S. Army faces multiple challenges in the next few years. 

To focus on the possibility of so-called “great power” conflicts with China or Russia, the Army needs expensive advanced weapons and other capabilities. It has a day-to-day demand for deployed forces. It also faces difficulties recruiting. The combination of those three dynamics will shape the future as those competing needs are balanced, CSIS says in the Army portion of the larger report, “U.S. Military Forces in FY2021.”  

China’s Army Becoming Modern, Mobile and More Lethal

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China’s Army Becoming Modern, Mobile and More Lethal

A new report to Congress reveals why the U.S. Army is thinking so much about China as a near-peer competitor. 

The army part of the People’s Liberation Army has 915,000 active-duty troops in combat units, making it the world’s largest ground force and one that is fielding upgraded combat and communications systems and other technologies in a drive toward a “more modern, mobile and lethal ground force,” says the DoD report titled “Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China.”