AI, Robots Could Make It Harder to Deter Conflict

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AI, Robots Could Make It Harder to Deter Conflict

The rise of artificial intelligence and autonomous systems could make it more difficult for the U.S. Army and its allies to deter potential adversaries, according to a recent Rand Corp. report.

“Up to this point, deterrence has primarily involved humans attempting to affect the decision calculus and perceptions of other humans,” the report says. “But what happens when decision-making processes are no longer fully under the control of humans?”

U.S. Military Must Adapt for Future Warfare

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U.S. Military Must Adapt for Future Warfare

The U.S. military has been a dominant force around the world, but that’s now changing as emerging technologies and global competition erode the American power advantage at “a startling pace,” author and national defense expert Christian Brose said.

“If we keep doubling down on sort of the ways and means we have traditionally relied upon as a joint force, we’re just going to make that problem worse for ourselves,” Brose said during the Association of the U.S. Army’s Thought Leaders webinar on Aug. 10. 

Webinar Examines Role of AI, Robots on Future Battlefield

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Webinar Examines Role of AI, Robots on Future Battlefield

Chris Brose, author of The Kill Chain: Defending America in the Future of High-Tech Warfare, will speak Aug. 10 as part of the Association of the U.S. Army’s Thought Leaders webinar series.

The presentation begins at 10 a.m. Eastern time. The event is free, but registration is required.

In his book, Brose examines how artificial intelligence, autonomous systems and other emerging technologies will define the future battlefield—and warns that the U.S. must adapt and respond in order to remain the world’s dominant military power.

Machines and AI Won’t End Future Wars

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Machines and AI Won’t End Future Wars

Robotics, automation and artificial intelligence may be a big part of future warfare, but human factors—not machine learning—will determine the outcome of war, said Brig. Gen. Miles Brown of the U.S. Army Futures Command’s Futures and Concepts Center.

Next Combat Vehicle Needs to Be Spoof-Proof

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Next Combat Vehicle Needs to Be Spoof-Proof

Success in autonomous vehicles would be having a dozen spoof-proof Next-Generation Combat Vehicles operated by one human, according to Brig. Gen. Ross Coffman, who leads the cross-functional team searching for vehicles that can provide more range, function and lethal punch on the battlefield.

AI, Robotics Could ‘Change Character of War’

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AI, Robotics Could ‘Change Character of War’

Defense Secretary Mark Esper sees the landscape for artificial intelligence capabilities through the eyes of a young Army infantry officer during the First Gulf War.

Artificial Intelligence Key to Army Modernization

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Brigadier General Matthew Easley addresses attendees at the Artificial Intelligence workshop at the 2019 AUSA Annual Meting and Exposition at the Washington Convention Center on Oct. 14, 2019.
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Artificial Intelligence Key to Army Modernization

Artificial intelligence has become a common part of everyday life, and it will continue to be an enabling technology for each of the Army’s modernization priorities, the director of the Army’s Artificial Intelligence Task Force said during an Oct. 14 Warriors Corner session at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.

“I walked into the AUSA [annual meeting] one year ago, and what did I see? AI was everywhere. It’s become a pervasive part of our civilian society,” Brig. Gen. Matthew Easley said.

U.S., Army Must Step Up Investment in AI

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U.S., Army Must Step Up Investment in AI

China is investing in artificial intelligence at a “much, much faster pace” than the U.S. government, though It is not yet ahead, a prominent AI expert recently told Army intelligence planners.

Tuomas Sandholm, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and a renowned expert on artificial intelligence, made his remarks at a lecture sponsored by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s intelligence division and the Association of the U.S. Army’s Virginia Colonial chapter.

Soldier’s Trust Required for Autonomous Systems

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Soldier’s Trust Required for Autonomous Systems

Army systems using artificial intelligence will require battlefield security to prevent information from being altered or blocked, says the U.S. Army Research Laboratory director, who specializes in sensors and electronic devices.

Speaking at the Army Autonomy and Artificial Intelligence Symposium and Exposition in Detroit, Philip Perconti cautioned that data can be hacked, and signals and information in the field can be altered. If that happens, soldiers will lose trust in the systems and turn them off.