Articles from Army Magazine, AUSA News, and Headline News relating to the Association of the United States Army's Annual Meeting

Urgent Need for More Attention to Cyber Threats

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Lt. Gen. Laura Potter, Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2, speaks during the AUSA Contemporary Military Forum: Evolution of Cyber and Information Advantage at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2022. (Jen Milbrett for AUSA)
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Urgent Need for More Attention to Cyber Threats

Army cyber forces must quickly and continually adapt to keep up with ever evolving threats, a panel of experts said Oct. 12 at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.

The Army constantly monitors and analyzes threats from China, which is America’s “pacing challenge,” and other adversaries including Russia, North Korea, Iran and terrorist organizations, said Lt. Gen. Laura Potter, deputy Army chief of staff for intelligence, G-2. “This really is a global problem,” she said.

Ukraine Lessons Inform Army Capabilities Development

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Douglas Bush, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, speaks during the  AUSA Contemporary Military Forum: Building the Army of 2030 - Modernization of Combat Capabilities at the AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022. (Carol Guzy for AUSA)
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Ukraine Lessons Inform Army Capabilities Development

As Russia’s war on Ukraine enters its ninth month, U.S. Army leaders are watching carefully and gleaning valuable lessons about the realities of the modern battlefield, the challenges of sustaining an extended conflict and the capabilities of the foe. 

During a panel Oct. 11 at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition, service modernization officials described what they’ve learned so far about how to best support Ukraine in its fight for survival and how the Army can posture itself to be resilient in future conflicts.

Army Leading on Homeland Defense, 4-Star Says

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Maj. Gen. Robert Whittle, Deputy Commanding General of US Army North, and Air Force Gen. Glen VanHerck, commander of Northern Command speak at the Homeland Security Seminar at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022. (Rod Lamkey for AUSA)
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Army Leading on Homeland Defense, 4-Star Says

When it comes to supporting homeland defense, the Army is leading the charge through integrated deterrence, the commander of U.S. Northern Command said Oct. 11.

Marshall Medal Presentation Closes AUSA 2022

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AUSA Registration at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Monday, Oct. 10, 2022. (Tasos Katopodis for AUSA)
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Marshall Medal Presentation Closes AUSA 2022

Day Three of AUSA 2022 features a series of contemporary military forums and the presentation of the Association of the U.S. Army’s highest award.

On-site registration opens at 8 a.m.

In the morning, an Army civilian forum will feature Army Undersecretary Gabe Camarillo, while Gen. Darryl Williams, commander of U.S. Army Europe and Africa, will lead a forum titled “Landpower—The Contested European Theater.” 

Leaders Urge Army Families to Seek Help, Support

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Sergeant Major of the Army Michael Grinston answers a question during the Family Forum III - Senior Leaders Town Hall at the AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022.
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Leaders Urge Army Families to Seek Help, Support

Questions about mental health and access to behavioral health providers prompted a frank discussion with Army senior leaders at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.

Addressing a standing room-only, town hall-style forum with military families, Army Secretary Christine Wormuth gave her assurance that seeking help is “nothing to be ashamed about,” acknowledging that she has sought counseling during difficult times in her own life.

Future Fight Poses Big Challenges for Army Medicine

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Maj. Gen. Michael J. Talley, Commanding General of the United States Army Medical Center of Excellence, speaks during the Warriors Corner at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022. (Jeromie Stephens for AUSA)
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Future Fight Poses Big Challenges for Army Medicine

The Army has a lot to learn and a lot to develop to prepare for large-scale, high-casualty and remote wars. 

In an Oct. 11 Warriors Corner discussion at the Association of the U.S. Army’s 2022 Annual Meeting and Exposition, medical leaders said they are sharply focused on caring for future casualties on distant battlefields from which quick evacuation isn’t possible.  

New Doctrine is Here, McConville Announces

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Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. James McConville speaks during the Eisenhower Luncheon at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022.  (Carol Guzy for AUSA)
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New Doctrine is Here, McConville Announces

Marking a major milestone in its transformation, the Army has unveiled a long-awaited update to its doctrine that will change the way soldiers train and fight in the future.

“There will always be a critical role for combat-credible forces around the world,” Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said Oct. 11 during the Association of the U.S. Army’s 2022 Annual Meeting and Exposition. “There’s no substitute for having American soldiers on the ground for reassurance and deterrence.”

Land Navigation is Coming Back

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Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Sims of Army Forces Command speaks during the Sergeant Major of the Army’s Professional Development Forum at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022. (Jeromie Stephens for AUSA)
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Land Navigation is Coming Back

It’s time for a return to land navigation training, said some of the Army’s top enlisted leaders, who agree that despite advances in technology, soldiers must master the most basic task: how to get where they’re going.

Grinston Urges Soldiers to ‘Tell your Army Story’

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Sergeant Major of the Army Michael Grinston speaks at the Leader Solarium at AUSA 2022 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2022. (Rod Lamkey for AUSA)
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Grinston Urges Soldiers to ‘Tell your Army Story’

The Army is launching several initiatives to combat shortfalls in recruiting, but one simple technique can be utilized by every single soldier—telling their Army story in their hometowns.

“We need to tell our stories in our hometowns,” Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael Grinston told a group of young leaders during the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exposition.