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Army Offers Variety of Spouse Employment Resources

Dee Geise, left, Chief of the Soldier & Family Readiness Division, moderates the AUSA Military Forum II: Military Spouse Deployment, at the 2019 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition at the Washington Convention Center on Oct. 15, 2019.
Dee Geise, left, Chief of the Soldier & Family Readiness Division, moderates the AUSA Military Forum II: Military Spouse Deployment, at the 2019 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition at the Washington Convention Center on Oct. 15, 2019.
Photo by: 
Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for AUSA
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Army spouses looking for employment can face challenges—frequent moves and state licensing requirements, for example—but they have a community of resources and opportunities available to help, experts say. 

“Family wellbeing is holistic and requires that we acknowledge and support every member of the family when needed and reach out to others as we can,” Lee Kelly, director of military community support programs in the Defense Department’s Office of Military Community and Family Policy, said Oct. 15 during the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Symposium.

Kelly said she recommends military spouses looking to expand their careers start with a career coach through Military OneSource or an employment readiness specialist on base.

Spouse Deployment_Pamphlets.jpg

Pamphlets and informational material given to attendees at the AUSA Military Forum II: Military Spouse Deployment, at the 2019 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition at the Washington Convention Center on Oct. 15, 2019.
Pamphlets and informational material given to attendees at the AUSA Military Forum II: Military Spouse Deployment, at the 2019 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition at the Washington Convention Center on Oct. 15, 2019.
(Photo Credit: Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for AUSA)

“Military spouses may not make it on base during the day, they may not have a moment to themselves until 9 p.m. at night,” Kelly said. “It’s important to know that career assistance, resume help and mock interview sessions are available when spouses are available.”

Kelly also provided information on Military OneSource’s Military Spouse Transition Program, or MySTeP. The program’s partners have hired more than 139,000 military spouses since the partnership began, she said.

Kelly’s presentation was followed by a panel of experts who provided information ranging from legislation affecting military spousal employment by state, to child care provider licensing for on-base Army spouses. 

“My intent is to make sure that our spouses are armed with the resources that are available to them,”  Krista Anderson, a military spouse ambassador for Army Emergency Relief, said during the panel.

Anderson told the audience that she’s found many military spouses are unaware of the resources available to them before providing information on numerous scholarships and programs available to military families and spouses.

 “I truly believe that a military community is family, and families look out for each other,” Kelly said. “Together, we are stronger.”

- Jennifer Benitz for AUSA