AUSA’s LTG Theodore Stroup, Jr., Achievement Award

AUSA’s LTG Theodore Stroup, Jr., Achievement Award

AUSA’s LTG Theodore Stroup, Jr.,
Achievement Award

Why: The purpose of the LTG Theodore Stroup, Jr., Achievement Award is to engage the next generation of Soldiers and DoD stakeholders at a young age, to promote their growth into mature members of the defense community and to build an awareness of AUSA.

What: This will be accomplished by an annual essay contest, open to JROTC students in their junior and senior years. Each essay must be accompanied by a letter of recommendation and will be focused on a matter relevant to current issues and/or military history in the defense world. The award, given to three entrants, consists of a monetary prize - one prize of $2,500, one prize of $1,500 and one prize of $1,000, and may include a two-year AUSA membership.

 

Read the following article: Lt. Col. Amelia Duran-Stanton and Col. Alicia Masson, “Lessons in Followership: Good Leaders Aren’t Always Out Front,” ARMY, June 2021, https://www.ausa.org/articles/lessons-followership-good-leaders-arent-always-out-front.

In almost every scenario in the Army, there are three roles: follower, manager and leader. Describe and summarize the author’s description of the definitions and dynamics among these three roles.

Then, bearing in mind the author’s admonitions that “servant leaders exist at all levels, but one must be able to follow first” and that “in the long run, being a better follower will help everyone be better leaders and managers,” apply the principles of this article to your own role as a young Soldier. What can you do in your current role as “follower” to support a mission and, at the same time, in support of the mission and your fellow Soldiers, improve yourself in such a way that you can one day be a competent and effective leader or manager?

Have you been in a situation where you’ve seen these dynamics at work already? How did they work well? If they worked poorly, how might they have worked better? What is your responsibility in such a dynamic?
 

Guidelines:
  • 1,000–1,500 words;
  • Times New Roman;
  • 12 pt font;
  • Double-spaced;
  • Include name, email address and JROTC Brigade on the first page;
  • Include a letter of recommendation from someone who is not a family member or peer;
  • Remember to cite all sources used—failure to do so is plagiarism.
 

Download as PDF

 

How/Where: With the assistance of U.S. Army Cadet Command, AUSA’s Education & Programs will push this opportunity out to JROTC programs nationwide, ensuring that awareness of the program’s benefits and of AUSA as a whole is made readily available to individuals who help to guide today’s JROTC Cadets as they choose their paths into adulthood.

When: We will begin accepting submission on 7 February 2022. Applications will be due no later than 31 May 2022. Winners will be notified soon after.

 

Click here to apply online

 

Lieutenant General Theodore Stroup, Jr., USA, Ret., for whom this award is named, is currently a Senior Fellow at AUSA and is the Education & Programs Writing Review Board Chairman. Retiring after 35 years of active duty service in the U.S. Army, he served as AUSA’s Vice President of Education and Executive Director of the Institute of Land Warfare from 1997 to 2013. Commissioned through the U.S. Military Academy in 1962, General Stroup later served as a course director in the Academy’s Military Science Branch. He holds an MA in Civil Engineering from Texas A&M University and an MA in Finance and Economics from the American University. A graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Armed Forces Staff College and U.S. Army War College, General Stroup is a Registered Professional Engineer.