Eighty years on, whether you call it the “Longest Day” or the “Mighty Endeavor,” D-Day on June 6, 1944, remains perhaps the most significant day for Western civilization in the 20th century.

As outlined by a February 1944 directive from the Allied Combined Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, led the largest amphibious force in history as it embarked on a mission to “enter the continent of Europe and, … undertake operations aimed at the heart of Germany and the destruction of her armed forces.”

When British Prime Minister Winston...

In the strategic expanses of the Indo-Pacific, the U.S. Army’s I Corps is pioneering an innovation to redefine defense collaboration through the Mission Partner Environment. This groundbreaking digital communications platform underscores America’s commitment to strengthening alliances, fostering interoperability and ensuring secure, real-time information-sharing with global partners. The Mission Partner Environment initiative is a cornerstone for future military operations in the Indo-Pacific, setting a new standard for global defense collaboration.

Recognizing the strategic shifts...

America has worked hard to fulfill its sacred commitment to bringing home its fallen heroes with dignity, honor and respect. But it must examine its capabilities as the U.S. Army and the rest of the military prepare for possible large-scale combat operations against a near-peer adversary.

An Army mortuary affairs company is designed to process up to 400 human remains a day from up to 20 mortuary affairs collection points, according to Field Manual 4-0: Sustainment Operations. But this capacity is not enough to manage the expected daily casualty rate early in a large-scale combat...

America has worked hard to fulfill its sacred commitment to bringing home its fallen heroes with dignity, honor and respect. But it must examine its capabilities as the U.S. Army and the rest of the military prepare for possible large-scale combat operations against a near-peer adversary.

An Army mortuary affairs company is designed to process up to 400 human remains a day from up to 20 mortuary affairs collection points, according to Field Manual 4-0: Sustainment Operations. But this capacity is not enough to manage the expected daily casualty rate early in a large-scale combat...

The U.S. Army’s current recruiting crisis is the symptom of a broad disconnect between the civilian population and America’s armed forces. Despite frequent news coverage of military operations, the American public really has no idea what each branch of service does, and the younger generation does not see the armed forces as a viable option for employment.

There are several layers to this problem; however, specific roadblocks steered the Army to where it is today, and minor tweaks could help the cause.

Post-9/11 security requirements, and changing legal regulations, have caused the...

My daughter Jade, who is a first lieutenant in her Air Force Junior ROTC cadet corps at Westside High School in Jacksonville, Florida, embodies the spirit of “the greatest generation.” With plans to enlist in the U.S. Army in 2025 upon graduating from high school, Jade exemplifies the ethos of “Be All You Can Be,” reminiscent of the bravery seen on the beaches of Normandy, France, on D-Day.

Drawn by a sense of duty and honor, she sees the Army as a pathway to personal and professional growth where she can embrace diverse career options and specialized training. Jade values the camaraderie...

The 80th anniversary of D-Day in June is a reminder of the significance of battlefields. Thousands of people visit sites like Omaha Beach in Normandy, France, every year for myriad reasons. Of these, some visit as part of a military staff ride, while others visit as tourists. Another reason for battlefield visits is that people identify as pilgrims on a pilgrimage.

In all three cases, the battlefield geography remains constant, but the motivations for the visit underpin why people are there, how they engage with the landscape and the meaning they make from their experiences.

Historicall...

Novel Approach to Overlord Decision-Making

Book cover

The Light of Battle: Eisenhower, D-Day, and the Birth of the American Superpower. Michel Paradis. HarperCollins. 528 pages. $35

By Col. Kevin Farrell, U.S. Army retired

This year marks the 80th anniversary of the Allied landings at Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944, remembered since as D-Day. It is only fitting, therefore, that there is renewed interest in that landmark event.

Arguably, no one was more important to the success of the world’s greatest amphibious invasion than Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, and it is not surprising that...

Retired Gen. Colin Powell provided thoughts on the importance of meetings in his 2012 book with Tony Koltz, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership. Although not explicit in his musings about the connection of the conduct of meetings with leadership, his meaning is pertinent and emphatic: Meetings have a special importance.

He implies that properly conducted, meetings are key to successful execution of missions, resolution of issues, settlement of disputes, expression of views and so forth. They also can be an effective leadership tool.

The intrinsic leadership value of a meeting lies...

Though hundreds of meters away, the catastrophic explosion sent a powerful shock wave through the operations center. As the battle staff watched the aerostat monitors in horror, injured civilians staggered away, covered in dust and blood, while shattered bodies littered the street. Burning and charred vehicles stood everywhere as soldiers, thrown to the ground behind concrete barriers, struggled to their feet.

The commander shot a quick glance at the sergeant major, who sprinted out the door to alert the tactical command post to get ready to roll. In a steady, hard voice, the boss called...

Just over 30 years ago, one of the U.S. Army’s most renowned and distinguished combat leaders passed away. Yet Maj. Gen. Aubrey “Red” Newman lives on in the numerous professional articles he penned, including 172 columns for ARMY magazine.

Newman, who died in January 1994 at age 90, stayed closely involved with the Army until his last years. I learned much from him and his “The Forward Edge” leadership columns in ARMY, which spanned more than 21 years, ending in 1988. Three of his lessons have particularly stuck with me. Army leaders today might still learn and benefit from these lessons...

The ongoing conflicts in Europe and the Middle East require military professionals and national security experts to reexamine preconceived notions of war in the 21st century. Many predicted a rapid overthrow of the Ukrainian government by Russian forces in February 2022. Subsequently, the U.S. and NATO hoped last year’s Ukrainian summer counteroffensive would result in substantive gains. As of this writing, it has not.

The conflict has devolved into a multiyear struggle, with both sides entering defensive positions resembling Europe’s World War I battlefields. Similarly, the Israel Defense...

The ongoing conflicts in Europe and the Middle East require military professionals and national security experts to reexamine preconceived notions of war in the 21st century. Many predicted a rapid overthrow of the Ukrainian government by Russian forces in February 2022. Subsequently, the U.S. and NATO hoped last year’s Ukrainian summer counteroffensive would result in substantive gains. As of this writing, it has not.

The conflict has devolved into a multiyear struggle, with both sides entering defensive positions resembling Europe’s World War I battlefields. Similarly, the Israel Defense...

Sergeants are on the rise in the U.S. Army Reserve, where a new initiative to promote more young soldiers more quickly is busting through a cultural gridlock and aiming to put an end to a yearslong shortage of NCOs.

Thousands of Army Reserve soldiers in the ranks of specialist and corporal have waited an average of almost seven years for promotion to sergeant, an advancement that takes about three years in the Regular Army.

Over time, slow promotion rates thinned the senior NCO ranks. NCOs weren’t replaced when people retired or left the service, and the number of specialists and...

In an ever-evolving global landscape, the ability to rapidly deploy is not just a military requirement—it’s a deterrence. The U.S. Army’s global competitors are kept at bay not just by firepower, but by the sheer efficiency of its deployment strategies, known as the strategic mobility triad. This triad comprises strategic airlift, sealift and pre-positioned equipment.

Each element of the triad supports the National Military Strategy by projecting military power anywhere in the world. Central to this is the Army Prepositioned Stock (APS) program, a synchronization of multiple logistics...